Arts With(out) Borders (Berne, 6-8 Juin 13)

Conférence

ARTS WITHOUT BORDERS: Rethinking Methodologies of Art and Culture in the Global Context. 6-8 June 2013 Universität Bern

Keynote Lectures:

Ursula Biemann, artist / writer / video essayist, based in Zurich: « Videogeographies: Artistic practice in the field »

Prof. Dr. Arnd Schneider, Department of Social Anthropology, University of Oslo: « For a New Hermeneutics in the Art – Anthropology Encounter »

Conference Summary:

In recent decades, global processes have had a profound impact on the humanities and social sciences. These processes are defined by an increasing migration and mobility of people, objects, and ideas across cultures and borders, a phenomenon that signals a need to address the contact zones of exchange and clash, and the energies or tensions produced in the process. While the impact of these phenomena on artistic production is acknowledged, the specific effects on our modes of analysis of those productions have yet to be addressed. Under the heading Arts With(out) Borders, this conference connects to theoretical and methodological challenges within the study of arts and culture. It furthermore asks whether borders — both physical and symbolic — have been built up or dissolved within the practice of research due to the increased mobility of culture and ideas and an expanding global interwovenness. Such issues have become relevant across disciplines, but they have not been satisfactorily recognized or addressed. This conference presents a diverse range of approaches to these questions and future directions for the study of arts in a global context. Spanning the fields of art production, art history, and anthropology, a platform will be opened to discuss the effects of global cultural processes on the analysis and study of artistic production, and the broader implications in political, social and cultural issues.

Le programme est consultable sur le lien suivant: http://www.artswithoutborders.ch/

The Itineraries of Art Topographies of Artistic Mobility in Europe and Asia 1500-1900 (Berlin, 23-25 mai)

Conférence

Annual Conference of the DFG Research Unit 1703 Transcultural Negotiations in the Ambits of Art. Comparative Perspectives on Historical Contexts and Contemporary Constellations

Organized by Project Area B Transgressive Itineraries and Transcultural Aesthetics of Artistic Exchange in cooperation with the DFG Research Project Landscape, Canon and Intermediality in Chinese Painting of the 1930s and 1940s

The conference discusses the interaction between routes as channels of communication and as modes of artistic experience in Europe and Asia. While recent scholarship has devoted attention to the economic and political historiographies of road-systems, this conference will focus on routes as stimuli of cultural transfer and artistic production. Addressing interactive overland and maritime networks as itineraries of contact and catalysts of artistic exchange will underscore the cultural agency of routes and interconnections. Framed in the historiography of longue durée, routes may be addressed as trajectories that cut across culturally determined geographies and periodizations. The conference concentrates on the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries and thereby foregrounds a period characterized by the unprecedented expansion and transformation of pre-existent route-networks. In the wake of the first global circumnavigation in 1522, the connection of overland-roads and maritime routes triggered new dynamics of transcontinental entanglements.

The conference aims at parallel perspectives on both Western Europe and East Asia, geographical regions that imagined each other as ›natural‹ terminus points of the ancient Eurasian trade networks. Consequently, new combinations of transcontinental telluric and nautical routes profoundly affected such predominant cultural topographies and symbolic paradigms. The rise of Asian and European port cities as nodes of maritime systems and prosperous cultural contact zones, often at the expense of inland metropoles, bespeaks this fundamental shift. By the end of the nineteenth century this process entered its end-stages; it is hardly coincidental that in this period, marked by colonialism and nationalism, some of the most enduring narratives of pre-modern routes evolved. To relate the proliferation of routes in the Early Modern era to art and artistic practices is also to engage with not only the actual translocation of persons, animals and objects, but with protocols and mechanisms of control and constraint. Furthermore, it is crucial to pose the question of how the visual arts in diverse historical and cultural contexts contributed to the fabrication of collective imaginations about routes past and present, as well as long-distance journeys. Parallel enquiries of practices and tropes of artistic mobility in Western Europe and East Asia enable the reconsideration of previously separate research in the agency of routes pursued at the intersection of the histories of art, cross-cultural transfer and entanglement.

Informations et programme: http://www.geschkult.fu-berlin.de/en/e/transkulturell/veranstaltungen/tagungen/2_Annual_Confrence.html

CFP/Appel à contribution: Global Encounters: Exchanges and Transfers of Knowledge in the Early Modern World

Conference: UAAC/ AAUC (Universities Art Association of Canada/l’association d’art des universités du Canada)

Location: Banff Centre, Banff, Alberta, October 17-20, 2013

This panel considers the exchange and transference of artistic and architectural knowledge in the early modern global world. Specifically, it reflects upon how such encounters instigated new and transformed prevailing perceptions about early modern visual artistic culture. Thus, this panel invites papers that consider these concepts not only from intercontinental perspectives (Spain, England, Italy, Hungary, and so on), but also among transoceanic environments (Americas, Europe, Asia, etc.). The panel seeks to break traditional perceptions about the flow of information among disparate territories and peoples. Topics could include, but are not limited to: 1) the ways the colonial encounters altered European art and architectural forms; 3) how the many European courts engaged with the Renaissance and Baroque styles; 2) how indigenous and colonial peoples crafted new artistic forms that hallenged or unsettled European perceptions of the colonies; 3) the interconnections between colonial territories or various royal courts are encouraged.

Session Chair: C. Cody Barteet (PhD)

Affiliation: University of Western Ontario

Each proposed paper must include: name of individual submitting the paper and their email contact, paper title; abstract (150-word maximum); keywords; and a brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum) that specifies their rank and institutional affiliation (if applicable).

For further details: http://www.uaac-aauc.com/en/uaac-conference

Design and Mobility: The Twenty-Second Annual Parsons/Cooper-Hewitt Graduate Student Symposium on the Decorative Arts and Design

26 et 27 avril 2013 Theresa Lang Student Center, 55 West 13th Street

This year’s theme is mobility which has become one of the defining traits of the age: new modes of living and transportation have created increasingly mobile lifestyles, aided by mobile communications networks, cultural products can move and spread across the globe with ease, and changing climate conditions are forcing relocations and rethinking of building patterns. On the individual scale, designers have worked with transformable and reusable products, or to help make individuals more mobile. The symposium will explore various aspects of mobility in the decorative arts and design — on macro and micro scales, from literal to  metaphoric perspectives.

Cliquer ici pour accéder au  programme

Objects in Motion in the Early Modern World (Los Angeles, 10-11 Mai 2013)

The Getty Research Institute, 10 Mai – 11Mai, 2013, 9:30 – 5:30

This two-day conference examines the circulation of objects across regions and cultures in the early modern period (1500–1800). Scholarly presentations address how this mobility led to new meanings, uses, and interpretations. Breakout sessions invite the audience to examine works of art in the Getty’s collections.

Scholarly presentations address such topics as the diplomatic exchange of gifts among the Ottoman Empire, Europe, and South Asia; the transfer of luxury goods between China and Mexico; and the reception of Persian ceramics and other foreign imports on the Swahili Coast of East Africa. Breakout sessions invite the audience to consider the questions raised by the conference while examining works of art in the Getty’s collections. A closing roundtable provides an opportunity to discuss the methodological and theoretical potential of this line of inquiry for the study and teaching of art history.

http://www.getty.edu/research/exhibitions_events/events/objects_in_motion/index.html